• Tig Welding Stainless Steel TIG Welding Stainless Steel Known as 300 series, austenitic stainless steels are the most commonly welded. These chrome nickel steels, in contrast to lower cost stainless have more alloys and are “non magnetic” (Exception, types 310 – 330). Austenitic grades of stainless steel typically contain a minimum of 16-26% chromium... Read more >>
  • TIG Welding Stainless Steel Basics TIG Welding Stainless Steel Basics In comparison with the welding of mild steel, for example, the austenitic stainless steels have several characteristics that require some revision of welding procedures that are considered standard for mild steel. The melting point of the austenitic grades stainless steels is lower, so less heat... Read more >>
  • The Art of TIG Welding Stainless Steel The Art of TIG Welding Stainless Steel When TIG welding stainless steel there are a few points to keep in mind to achieve a cosmetically appealing and sound weld. Because stainless steel does not adequately dissipate heat, maintaining proper heat input when welding is critical. Too much heat can lead... Read more >>
  • TIG Welding Stainless Steel : Gas Coverage TIG Welding Stainless Steel : Gas Coverage Using the appropriate type and amount of shielding gas is another important way to prevent carbide precipitation when TIG welding stainless steel. Typically, pure argon provides the best results when welding thinner austenitic stainless steel, but the addition of small percentages of helium... Read more >>
  • How to TIG Weld Stainless Steel Effectively : Preventing Carbide Precipitation In order to effectively TIG weld stainless steel, it important to consider carbide precipitation. TIG Weld Stainless Steel : Carbide Precipitation What is Carbide Precipitation? Carbide precipitation occurs when the chrome and carbon in 300 series stainless steel is drawn out of the material and reacts to the atmosphere. It... Read more >>
  • Stainless Steel vs Aluminum The question of Stainless steel vs Aluminum often arises when considering components for a number of applications. Fatigue Strength and Life –* Stainless steel* has 5-10 times the fatigue strength (resistance to bending & vibration) of aluminum pipe. The fatigue strength of stainless steel is 25-75,000 psi, compared to aluminum... Read more >>
  • Stainless Steel Stainless steel is a steel alloy with a minimum of 10.5% chromium content by mass. In the early nineteen hundreds, metallurgists noticed that chromium had a greater attraction to oxygen than iron did so they added the element chromium to steel. Studies prove that when at least 10% chromium was... Read more >>