a. Welding cannot always be done in the most desirable position. It must be done in the position in which the part will be used. Often that may be on the ceiling, in the corner, or on the floor. Proper description and definition is necessary since welding procedures must indicate the welding position to be performed, and welding process selection is necessary since some have all-position capabilities whereas others may be used in only one or two positions. The American Welding Society has defined the four basic welding positions as shown in figure 11-9.

OxyFuel Horizontal Welding

b. In horizontal welding, the weld axis is approximately horizontal, but the weld type dictates the complete definition. For a fillet weld, welding is performed on the upper side of an approximately horizontal surface and against an approximately vertical surface. For a groove weld, the face of the weld lies in an approximately vertical plane.

c. Butt welding in the horizontal position is a little more difficult to master than flat position. This is due to the tendency of molten metal to flow to the lower side of the joint. The heat from the torch rises to the upper side of the joint. The combination of these opposing factors makes it difficult to apply a uniform deposit to this joint.

d. Align the plates and tack weld at both ends (fig. 11-10). The torch should move with a slight oscillation up and down to distribute the heat equally to both sides of the joint, thereby holding the molten metal in a plastic state. This prevents excessive flow of the metal to the lower side of the joint, and permits faster solidification of the weld metal. A joint in horizontal position will require considerably more practice than the previous techniques. It is, however, important that the technique be mastered before passing on to other types of weld positions.

OxyFuel Horizontal Welding